2017

It’s about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward

“And when things got hard, you started looking for something to blame, like a big shadow. Let me tell you something you already know. The world ain’t all sunshine and rainbows. It’s a very mean and nasty place and I don’t care how tough you are, it will beat you to your knees and keep you there permanently if you let it. You, me, or nobody is gonna hit as hard as life. But it ain’t about how hard you hit. It’s about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward. How much you can take and keep moving forward. That’s how winning is done.”

I enjoyed this quote from Rocky Balboa the first time I saw the movie, and I appreciate it even more now after getting my a** kicked by this f-ing blood disease, but still grinding along every day.

A Scala method to run any block of code slowly

The book, Advanced Scala with Cats, has a nice little function you can use to run a block of code “slowly”:

def slowly[A](body: => A) = try body finally Thread.sleep(100)

I’d never seen a try/finally block written like that (without a catch clause), so it was something new for the brain.

In the book they run a factorial method slowly, like this:

slowly(factorial(n - 1).map(_ * n))

FWIW, you can modify slowly to pass in the length of time to sleep, like this:

def slowly[A](body: => A, sleepTime: Long) = try body finally Thread.sleep(sleepTime)

Seeing a therapist

I’ve been seeing a therapist for the last several years. With all that I’ve been going through health-wise, it’s been nice to have someone to talk to.

When I got to her office last night there was nobody else there, so we just sat in the lobby and started talking. But after a while some other people came in, so we had to move. When we got up to move I used telekinesis to move some of the chairs and our things. “How .. how .. how are you doing that?,” she stammered.

“Well, I guess I think about the objects, and then I kind of create my own gravity, or maybe something like a tractor beam, and well, then I move them.” Nobody had ever asked me that before, so my answer wasn’t very well thought out.

Anyway, she said I’m doing fine, but she took a couple of pills herself.

(Notes from a dream, March 9, 2017.)

Perform the work that has to be done without attachment

I like most of Dana Stabenow’s work, and while I didn’t particularly like Dead in the Water, I did enjoy some of the quotes in the book, such as, “Always perform the work that has to be done without attachment,” which comes from the Bhagavad Gita, of which there are many translations (such as this one, this one, and this one).