script

How to use curl scripts to test RESTful web services

Table of Contents1 - GET, POST, DELETE, and PUT examples2 - More POST examples3 - Headers returned by the server4 - Discussion5 - Summary

There may be better ways to do this, but as I’m writing a mobile app with the client written in Sencha Touch, and the server written with the Play Framework, I’ve written some curl scripts to simulate GET, POST, DELETE, and PUT request (method) calls to my Play Framework “RESTful” services.

How to start a Play Framework application running as a service on Ubuntu 16.04

As a relatively brief note, this seems to be the correct way to start a Play Framework application as a service on an Ubuntu 16.04 system.

A shell script to start your Play application

First, you need to create a little Unix shell script that runs the startup command for your Play Framework application. I created a Play application for a website named kbhr.co, so I cd into the directory for that website:

A Play Framework 2.6 startup script example (Scala)

Play Framework FAQ: Can you share an example of a Play Framework 2.6 startup script, i.e., a shell script that shows the commands and parameters you use to run a Play Framework application?

Sure. Assuming that you created a production mode version of your application with the sbt dist command, deployed that zip file to a production server, and have a Play Framework 2.6 application named “myapp,” you can put a command like this in a Unix/Linux shell script to start your Play application:

A Scala shell script to insert text before a matching pattern

I don’t remember exactly why I wrote this Scala shell script, but if I remember right I was having a problem getting sed to work properly, so I wrote this little script to insert an Amazon Kindle “break” tag before each <h1> tag in an HTML file:

A Scala “Word of the day” shell script

I have a 19" monitor on the counter between my kitchen and living room, and it’s powered by a Raspberry Pi. I use the Linux Phosphor screen saver to show a scrolling “news and stock ticker” on the display, which I’ve programmed to show news from several different sources (Atom and Rss feeds, along with other news and data sources). An old version of the display looks like this:

My Raspberry Pi news ticker display

Today I added a new “Word of the day” feature to the display, and as with all of the other code, I wrote a Scala shell script to generate the output.

Linux: How to get the basename from the full filename

As a quick note today, if you’re ever writing a Linux shell script and need to get the filename from a complete (canonical) directory/file path, you can use the Linux basename command like this:

$ basename /foo/bar/baz/foo.txt
foo.txt

How to write a Scala shell script that reads input from STDIN

As a quick note, if you need an example of how to write a Scala shell script that reads from STDIN (standard input) and writes to STDOUT (standard output), this code shows a solution:

#!/bin/sh
exec scala -savecompiled "$0" "$@"
!#

import scala.io.StdIn

var line = ""
while ({line = StdIn.readLine(); line != null}) {
    println(line)
}

A Scala shell script to read HTML H1 tag attributes

I’m putting this Scala shell script out here as a “source code snippet” so I can find it again if I need it. This file reads an input file that contains a series of HTML <h1> tags. I use this as part of a process of publishing an Amazon Kindle ebook from an HTML file, and in one of the steps of the creation process, I use this script to help create the Table of Contents (TOC) for the book.

Here’s the source code: