script

A Scala shell script to move your mouse cursor

I’m currently trying to automate a GUI task, and as a part of that, one thing I need to do is move the mouse cursor.

In short, the solution I came up with was to write a Scala shell script that uses the Java Robot class to move the mouse. Here’s the source code for my script, which I named MoveMouse.sh:

How to run a Scala SBT-packaged jar file with Java (the `java` command)

If you want to run/execute a main method from a jar file you created with Scala and the sbt package command, this little tutorial shows how to do it. To make things a little more complicated, my Scala project depends on three external jar files, and the main method requires a command-line argument.

As noted in the Summary, you’ll probably want to use a tool like SBT-Assembly for larger projects.

How to install Script-Fu scripts to work with Gimp (Mac OS X)

I couldn’t get the Gimp “Reflection” filter to work (on Gimp 2.8), so after a little digging around I found that the GimpHelp.org website has kept some of the Gimp scripts — called Script-Fu scripts — up to date. So I downloaded those scripts, and then had to figure out how to make them work in Gimp.

How to make your Scala shell scripts run faster by pre-compiling them

This is an excerpt from the Scala Cookbook (partially modified for the internet). This is a short recipe, Recipe 14.13, “How to make your Scala shell scripts run faster by pre-compiling them.”

Problem

You love using Scala as a scripting language, but you’d like to eliminate the lag time in starting up a script.

Solution

Use the -savecompiled argument of the Scala interpreter to save a compiled version of your script.

A basic Scala script like this:

How to prompt users for input from Scala shell scripts

This is an excerpt from the Scala Cookbook, partially modified for the internet. This is Recipe 14.12, “How to prompt users for input from Scala shell scripts.”

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Problem

You want to prompt a user for input from a Scala shell script and read her responses.

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Solution

Use the readLine, print, printf, and Console.read* methods to read user input, as demonstrated in the following script. Comments in the script describe each method:

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How to access command-line arguments in Scala shell scripts alvin June 20, 2015 - 4:34pm

This is an excerpt from the Scala Cookbook (partially modified for the internet). This is Recipe 14.11, “How to access command-line arguments in a Scala shell script.”

Problem

You want to access the command-line arguments from your Scala shell script.

Solution

Use the same script syntax as shown in Recipe 14.8, “Generating Documentation with scaladoc”, and then access the command-line arguments using args, which is a List[String]` that is implicitly made available:

How to use Scala as a scripting language

This is an excerpt from the Scala Cookbook (partially modified for the internet). This is Recipe 14.10, “How to use Scala as a scripting language.”

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Problem

You want to use Scala as a scripting language on Unix systems, replacing other scripts you’ve written in a Unix shell (Bourne Shell, Bash), Perl, PHP, Ruby, etc.

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Solution

Save your Scala code to a text file, making sure the first three lines of the script contain the lines shown, which will execute the script using the scala interpreter:

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Mac OS X: ‘sed’ commands I use to clean MacDown HTML output

FWIW, this is the source code for a sed script I use on my Mac OS X system to convert HTML output generated by MacDown into a format I need. MacDown generates some extra “cruft” that I don’t need, so I use these sed commands to clean up that HTML output:

Raspberry Pi camera module shell script

As a quick note today, this is the source code for a Raspberry Pi (RPI) camera module shell script that I created so a friend can turn her Raspberry Pi camera on and off from the RPI command line (Linux command line):