tutorial

How to use the Android 7 split screen feature (tutorial)

Android 7 comes with a cool new “split screen” feature where you can look at two apps running at the same time. This little pictorial/tutorial shows how to use this split-screen feature.

Source code for an Android AsyncTask (REST client) example alvin July 20, 2017 - 12:41pm

I just got back into using an Android AsyncTask, and it took me a little while to re-load the concepts in my head. I used AsyncTask’s a few years ago, but haven’t used them since.

To help remember how they work, I created a little AsyncTask example project, and I’ve included all of the source code for that project here. I’ll show all of the source code for my classes and configuration files, and then explain the code at the end.

Learning Functional Programming in Scala (pdf)

Table of Contents1 - What’s new (June 25, 2017)2 - Buying the book3 - One more thing4 - Preview5 - Some time in the future ...

My new book, Learning Functional Programming in Scala, is currently on sale as a PDF you can purchase for just $25 US. (The price will be increased to $30 on August 1st.) Details are listed below.

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What’s new (June 25, 2017)

If you’ve been following along with me recently, the latest changes are:

I wonder what else I did

A strange thing about the illness I’ve gone through is that I don’t have any memory of certain events.

For example — from what I can gather — during my worst time(s) I wrote this Collection of ScalaTest BDD examples using FunSpec tutorial, but I have no memory of writing it. I know that I wrote it because (a) it’s my writing style and (b) it’s on my website, but other than that, I have no recall of it. None. Zilch.

For a little while that bothered me, but now I look at it as something that’s interesting. I think it’s weird/amazing that I could write a tutorial and have no memory of writing it (or the process of researching it), but I guess that’s how the brain can work when things are screwed up. During the same time I also wrote this note to “buy some december at the grocery store,” so I know my brain was definitely going out to lunch at times.

I can see how this can be frustrating for people with chronic memory problems, but at the moment I look at it more as a mystery, like, “Huh, well, I wonder what else I did during that time?”

“Alexa written with Akka” = Aleka

Table of Contents1 - Background2 - Assumptions3 - 1) Create an SBT project4 - 2) Create a Scala app5 - 3) Messages6 - 4) The brain7 - 5) The mouth8 - 6) The project directory structure9 - 7) Running the application10 - The source code11 - What’s next

As a way of demonstrating how to write code with Akka, Scala, and functional programming (FP), I started creating a new project this weekend. I named it Aleka, because it may eventually be like Amazon’s Echo/Alexa, written with Akka (and Scala).

(I suppose a better name might be “Ekko,” after Echo, but I have a niece named Aleka, so unless she objects, this works for me.)