macos

How to make a backup copy (ISO) of a CD or DVD using the MacOS dd command

Table of Contents1 - Step 1: Insert a CD or DVD2 - Step 2: Find the CD/DVD identifier3 - Step 3: Unmount the drive4 - Step 4: Copy the DVD with the dd command5 - Step 5: Eject your media

If you want to make a backup copy (an ISO image) of a CD or DVD on a MacOS system using the dd command at the Mac Terminal command line, I’ll demonstrate the process in this tutorial.

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Step 1: Insert a CD or DVD

Assuming that you’re using an external CD/DVD drive, the first step is to connect your drive to your computer, and then insert a CD or DVD. If you insert a movie or music CD and an application automatically starts playing, quit that application.

MacOS screen annotation/presentation software

I was going to write a little application to let me annotate my MacOS screen during presentations, but the Ink2Go product looks like it does exactly what I was thinking. As I’m creating a video presentation, such as when showing how to write some Scala or Android code, I want to be able to draw on the screen, such as writing text, arrows, circles, and boxes to highlight parts of the screen. Ink2Go looks like what I want.

Example: How to use javapackager to build a MacOS application bundle

Table of Contents1 - Building a MacOS application bundle with javapackager2 - The longer story3 - The Mac/Java class4 - The three scripts5 - javapackager notes

I recently learned how to use the Java javapackager command to build a macOS application bundle — i.e., a regular macOS application — from a Java application. In this tutorial I’ll show how to create a Mac application bundle from a simple Java class, in this case a Java Swing class.