macos

Jeyes, a Java version of Xeyes

Jeyes, a Java version of Xeyes

In my spare time back in 2011 I created a Java version of the old Unix/X-Windows “Xeyes” application. If you ever used Xeyes, you know it as a set of eyes that are displayed on-screen, and follow the mouse cursor as you move it around.

Now in 2019 I just brought it back to life, and here’s a 56-second video that shows how it works:

Notes on how to build and run an Android application from the command line alvin March 6, 2019 - 8:21pm

As a brief note to self, this is how I compiled/built an Android application (APK) from the MacOS command line and then ran it in an emulator. I include both my application- and system-specific notes, as well as the more generic commands I found at this Android.com URL:

TextMate TODO tag syntax highlighting

As a brief note to self, I like the way the TODO tag is highlighted when using TextMate, so I dug around to see how it worked so I can make other words be highlighted the same way it is. The short answer is that in TextMate, click the Bundles menu, select Edit Bundles, then scroll down to select TODO near the bottom of the list, then Language Grammars and TODO. The last few steps are shown in the image.

Scala code to find (and move or remove) duplicate files

My MacBook recently told me I was running out of disk space. I knew that the way I was backing up my iPhone was resulting in me having multiple copies of photos and videos, so I finally decided to fix that problem by getting rid of all of the duplicate copies of those files.

So I wrote a little Scala program to find all the duplicates and move them to another location, where I could check them before deleting them. The short story is that I started with over 28,000 photos and videos, and the code shown below helped me find nearly 5,000 duplicate photos and videos under my ~/Pictures directory that were taking up over 18GB of storage space. (Put another way, deleting those files saved me 18GB of storage.)

How to easily determine the blocksize of a filesystem

I just saw that this is a way you can easily determine the blocksize of a filesystem, at least a Mac/Unix/Linux filesystem:

$ echo foo > foo

$ du -h foo
4.0K    foo

I tried to do the same thing with touch foo, but that didn’t work. Without digging into it more, the key seems to be in having very little text in the file, at which point the du command shows the minimum block size for the file.

How to use the Linux ‘scp’ command without a password to make remote backups

Summary: How to create a public and private key pair to use ssh and scp without using a password, which lets you automate a remote server backup process.

Over the last two years I've ended up creating a large collection of websites and web applications on a variety of Linux servers that are hosted with different companies like GoDaddy and A2 Hosting. I recently embarked on a mission to automate the backup processes for all these sites, and as a result of this effort, I thought I'd share what I've learned here.

Unix find command: How to move a group of files into the current directory

I just bought a bunch of MP3 music files from Amazon, and when I downloaded the zip file they provide onto my Mac, it was a bunch of files in a bunch of subdirectories; not really convenient to work with when you’re trying to import them into iTunes. So I used this Unix find command to move all of the music files from the subdirectories they were scattered in into the root directory that was created when I expanded the zip file:

cd Amazon-Music-Folder
find . -type f -exec mv {} . \;

If you ever need to either copy or move a bunch of files with a single command, I hope this example shows the correct find command syntax for your needs. (If you need to copy the files, use the cp command instead of the mv command.)

Why is my MacBook warm when the lid is closed (in sleep mode)?

Table of Contents1 - Troubleshooting2 - My solution3 - Possible problem: Energy Saver settings4 - Possible problem: Bluetooth settings5 - More information6 - Summary

When I woke up last night it was a little windy outside, so I decided to unplug my MacBook Pro because the power tends to flicker here. When I picked up the MacBook I noticed that it was very warm, even though the lid was closed and it was in sleep mode. This morning I decided to dig into the “Why is my MacBook hot even though the lid is closed and it’s in sleep mode” question.