image

Yoda on Luke’s back (cartoonized with Gimp)

This is a cartoonize’d version of Yoda on Luke Skywalker’s back during Luke’s initial training in the swamp. To create it, I found the original movie image with a Google search, opened the image in Gimp, then worked back and forth with a Cartoonized plugin effect, the Beautify options, and the Artistic/Oilify effect. I can do a lot better than this, but for the purposes of this example, I created this cartoon image in less than five minutes. Given more time, I would clean up Yoda quite a bit before using the Cartoonize effect.

I’ve used Gimp to create almost 2,000 images that I use with the Mac screensaver “rotate images” feature, and this is the latest addition.

(Click the image to see the full-size, 1200x600 pixel image.)

A gallery of 130+ Gimp filters/effects examples

There are times when I work on images a lot with Gimp, and then there are times when I don’t work with Gimp for a month or two. When I don’t work with Gimp a lot, I tend to forget about all of the different things I can do with. Therefore, I have created this page as a “Gimp special effects cheat sheet” page to help remind me of all the cool things I can do with Gimp effects.

More examples of working with Gimp effects (filters)

In a previous article I shared a catalog of examples of Gimp filter effects. In this brief pictorial I’ll share examples of some of my favorite Gimp effects on a favorite image of a favorite dog. I don’t have a particular goal in this work, I just want to try out some different filters and effects and see where they lead.

Here’s a raw image of a Siberian Husky named Zeus that I knew very well:


How to create a LibGDX ImageButton

I just started working with LibGDX, so I don’t know if there’s a better way to create a LibGDX Scene2d ImageButton, but I can confirm that this approach works:

Texture hikeTexture = new Texture(Gdx.files.internal("hike_btn.jpg"));
Texture hikeTexturePressed = new Texture(Gdx.files.internal("hike_btn_pressed.jpg"));
hikeButton = new ImageButton(
    new TextureRegionDrawable(new TextureRegion(hikeTexture)),
    new TextureRegionDrawable(new TextureRegion(hikeTexturePressed))
);
hikeButton.setPosition(60, 300);  //hikeButton is an ImageButton
stage.addActor(hikeButton);

I currently use this code in the show() method of a class that implements Screen, and it works as desired.

Chicago Cubs “oilified” image

I just ran across this image. I created it way back when I was first learning how to create artistic effects with Gimp. I don’t know for sure because I didn’t save the working file, but I suspect that I created this image by starting with an image from a YouTube video, then blurred it a little bit, then applied the “oilify” effect to it one or more times.

P.S. — If you’re old enough, you can identify the pitcher and the batter, despite the Gimp artistic effects. :)

Luke Skywalker black and white “life sketch”

This is another sketch of Luke Skywalker from whatever the last Star Wars movie was called. I started with this earlier image I created, then converted it to a Gimp “life sketch” by going to Beautify > Beautify > Art > Life Sketch > 100%.

While I’m in the neighborhood, I also created this fake Luke Skywalker “hoodie” oil painting.

Android: How to reference a drawable image in XML (or Java)

When you need to reference a drawable image from an Android XML file, such as a layout or menu file, use this tag:

android:src="@drawable/myimage"

That assumes that you have a file named myimage.png in your res/drawable directories. As a more complete example, this shows how I reference an image named images_show.png in an Android menu item: