design

The essence of Scala ~ Martin Odersky

Per this tweet, back on May 15 Martin Odersky shared a slide with these contents:

The essence of Scala: Fusion of functional and object-oriented programming in a typed settings.

- Functions for the logic
- Objects for the modularity

A gallery of 130+ Gimp filters/effects examples

There are times when I work on images a lot with Gimp, and then there are times when I don’t work with Gimp for a month or two. When I don’t work with Gimp a lot, I tend to forget about all of the different things I can do with. Therefore, I have created this page as a “Gimp special effects cheat sheet” page to help remind me of all the cool things I can do with Gimp effects.

The place to fight design wars is in new markets alvin May 14, 2018 - 5:35pm

“When Yahoo bought Viaweb, they asked me what I wanted to do. I had never liked the business side very much, and said that I just wanted to hack. When I got to Yahoo, I found that what hacking meant to them was implementing software, not designing it. Programmers were seen as technicians who translated the visions (if that is the word) of product managers into code.

This seems to be the default plan in big companies. They do it because it decreases the standard deviation of the outcome. Only a small percentage of hackers can actually design software, and it’s hard for the people running a company to pick these out. So instead of entrusting the future of the software to one brilliant hacker, most companies set things up so that it is designed by committee, and the hackers merely implement the design.

If you want to make money at some point, remember this, because this is one of the reasons startups win. Big companies want to decrease the standard deviation of design outcomes because they want to avoid disasters. But when you damp oscillations, you lose the high points as well as the low. This is not a problem for big companies, because they don’t win by making great products. Big companies win by sucking less than other big companies.

So if you can figure out a way to get in a design war with a company big enough that its software is designed by product managers, they’ll never be able to keep up with you ... The place to fight design wars is in new markets, where no one has yet managed to establish any fortifications. That's where you can win big by taking the bold approach to design, and having the same people both design and implement the product. ”

~ I hope to write more about this at some point, but for now this is a long quote from a Paul Graham blog post titled, Hackers and Painters

The three things a Business Analyst should think about during meetings

Table of Contents1 - The three concerns of the business analyst2 - “Um, but I just write software requirements ...”3 - “But I don’t do database design or prototypes ...”4 - “But what about ...”5 - A fourth element

When it comes to working as a business analyst, I’ve learned that there are just three things you need to keep in your mind when meeting with your customers (the project sponsor (gold owner) and domain experts (“goal donors”)) to gather requirements. These three thoughts will keep your meeting on track, lead you to the next question, and will help you know when your work is done.

Kent Beck’s Four Rules of Software Design (also known as “Simple Design”) alvin May 7, 2018 - 5:32pm

For the first time in many years I just came across Kent Beck’s Four Rules of Software Design:

  1. Passes the tests
  2. Reveals intention (should be easy to understand)
  3. No duplication (DRY)
  4. Fewest elements (remove anything that doesn’t serve the three previous rules)

There are wording variations on those rules, but I got those specific words from this Martin Fowler post. As he notes, “The rules are in priority order, so ‘passes the tests’ takes priority over ‘reveals intention.’”

For more information on Kent Beck’s Four Rules of Software Design, see that link, or this link to the original rules on c2.com.

More examples of working with Gimp effects (filters)

In a previous article I shared a catalog of examples of Gimp filter effects. In this brief pictorial I’ll share examples of some of my favorite Gimp effects on a favorite image of a favorite dog. I don’t have a particular goal in this work, I just want to try out some different filters and effects and see where they lead.

Here’s a raw image of a Siberian Husky named Zeus that I knew very well: